Having a speech disorder—whether it’s a stutter, a slur, or a lisp—can make a presentation extremely frightening.

I should know. I’ve had a lisp for my entire life.

Though I’ve gone through years of therapy to correct it, I still have difficulties with the letters S and Z. I have always been very self-conscious of it. When speaking in public, I’m afraid of how it will affect my message.

I understand that my lisp isn’t going to magically disappear. I’ve accepted that. I’ve also decided that it won’t hold me back. I didn’t want to miss out on a wonderful opportunity just because I sound a little weird on certain sounds. Because of this decision, I’ve given speeches which include the classic best man speech, award acceptance speeches, and persuasive presentations helping people to change their lives.

In this article, I’ll share five tips for gaining confidence as a speaker when you have a speech disorder.

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On Fridays, we dip into the article archive and emerge with one of the most memorable articles. We’ll dust it off, shine a light on it, and consider it from a new perspective.

Today’s Flashback Article

This week, we’re transporting back to May 2009 to learn about a magical speechwriting technique: the rule of three.

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On Fridays, we dip into the article archive and emerge with one of the most memorable articles. We’ll dust it off, shine a light on it, and consider it from a new perspective.

This week, we also spotlight recent releases that may help you enrich your public speaking library.

Resources for Speakers – Public Speaking Books

Check out these recently released public speaking and communications books:

Today’s Flashback Article

This week, we’re headed back to February 2010 for one of the most controversial articles in Six Minutes lore which makes the simple claim that average speakers are not effective speakers.

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There are many ways to organize your presentation. The choices you make seriously impact the success of your presentation.

If you order your material in an intuitive manner that your audience can readily understand, they are more likely to be persuaded.

If you order your material in an awkward manner, your audience will struggle to understand, and they will resist being persuaded by your message.

Given the criticality of your presentation sequence, how do you choose the right one for your topic and your audience?

In this article, we:

  • survey the available sequence types,
  • give examples of presentations which fit each scheme, and
  • discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each.

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On Fridays, we dip into the article archive and emerge with one of the most memorable articles. We’ll dust it off, shine a light on it, and consider it from a new perspective.

Today’s Flashback Article

This week, we’re headed back to October 2010, when we gave 16 tips for introducing a speaker.

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When your presentation ends, what would you like your audience to think:

  • “Those slide fonts were awesome! So innovative! So artistic! So shadowy and provocative!”
  • “I didn’t notice the slide fonts.”

 

It always surprises me when I encounter a speaker who wants their slide fonts to stand out, as if it were reasonable compensation for a lack of compelling content.

Great design of slide fonts means that they are easy to read and otherwise not noticeable. You want your message to stand out and be memorable, not your slide fonts.

In this article, we look at simple guidelines to help you make wise font choices so that you, and not your fonts, are memorable.

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On Fridays, we dip into the article archive and emerge with one of the most memorable articles. We’ll dust it off, shine a light on it, and consider it from a new perspective.

Today’s Flashback Article

This week, we’re headed back to January 2013, where we learned the primary benefits of using flip charts, and gave 17 practical, easy-to-apply tips for using them in your presentations.

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This article reviews the 2015 TED talk by Suki Kim about her experience living undercover as a teacher for six months in North Korea.

Aside from the powerful core message, Kim’s talk also has several speaking lessons for us, including:

  • how to read a speech without being flat and emotionless
  • how to use pauses effectively
  • how to align words with facial expressions to convey emotion
  • how to make every word count

This is the latest in a series of speech critiques here on Six Minutes.

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On Fridays, we dip into the article archive and emerge with one of the most memorable articles. We’ll dust it off, shine a light on it, and consider it from a new perspective.

At the request of Six Minutes readers, we’re also reviving an old tradition of spotlighting recent releases to help you enrich your public speaking library.

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On Fridays, we dip into the article archive and emerge with one of the most memorable articles. We’ll dust it off, shine a light on it, and consider it from a new perspective.

Today’s Flashback Article

This week, we’re headed back to December 2011, when we provided strategies to those seeking how to reduce “um”s and other filler words, from their speaking vocabulary.

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On Fridays, we dip into the article archive and emerge with one of the most memorable articles. We’ll dust it off, shine a light on it, and consider it from a new perspective.

Today’s Flashback Article

This week, our time capsule returns to January 2010, when we began our 7-article series on the 2300-year-old theory of ethos, pathos, and logos:

So, what are ethos, pathos, and logos?

In simplest terms, they correspond to:

  • Ethos: credibility (or character) of the speaker
  • Pathos: emotional connection to the audience
  • Logos: logical argument

Together, they are the three persuasive appeals. In other words, these are the three essential qualities that your speech or presentation must have before your audience will accept your message.

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